ARTICLES

FEATURES | INTERVIEWS | NEWS | FRIGHTFEST | REVIEWS | BOOTH'S BLOG

FrightFest Talks To Director Joe Begos
By James Whittington, Thursday 18th February 2016

Joe BegosAhead of the UK Premiere of The Mind’s Eye at the Glasgow Film Festival, FrightFest probed the mind of its director, Joe Begos. You can catch his movie, Almost Human on Horror in April.

FF: Have you got your love of 80s movies out of your system now?

JB: I'm not sure! A lot of it comes through as organic as that's what my brain sponged in at the most impressionable movie-going age possible. I definitely would love to make some more contemporary movies in the future but I feel like no matter the time period, the aesthetic of the 80's (all practical, fun, sensationalized filmmaking) will bleed through.

FF: Brian De Palma or David Cronenberg? Which director had the most inspirational impact on The Mind’s Eye?

JB: I think they both seeped through, as I love the stories and imagery that Cronenberg has come up with, though the highly technical and orchestrated filmmaking process of Brian De Palma was equally important.

FF: Actor Graham Skipper stars again like he did in Almost Human, and you wrote the part of Zack Connors for him, Why do you like him so much, what does he bring to your table?

JB: Graham has so many qualities that I like as an actor, it's hard to single out specific ones. For this film in particular, I feel his blue collar, regular look really helped attribute to the "off-the-grid drifter" feel, and his giant bulging eyes were integral to the telekinetic scenes. No matter what you put on the page, Graham is willing to transform himself into it and give you whatever you need to make what's in your head a reality.

FF: John Speredakos brings new meaning to the words over-the-top as Dr Slovak, his idea or yours?

JB: I think it was a combination of us both finding the rhythm and tone. It's a delicate balance in something like this, but between his performance and the editing, i feel like we were able to strike it just right.

FF: It’s quite a romantic movie too? Are you going soft on us?

JB: Never!

FF: Great to see Larry Fessenden play Zack’s father, do you see him as a creative mentor?

JB: It was a dream come true to have Larry in the film. His whole attitude towards filmmaking and the art form in general, even after all of his success really is something to behold. To see him having fun on set and be proud of his work in the film was unbelievable.

FF: Steve Moore’s soundtrack is absolutely brilliant, and complements the movie so much. Where did you find him?

JB: Steve is amazing. Steve is a member of the fantastic synth horror band ZOMBI, and I became a fan of his work through that. I reached out to him, and in some weird twist of fate he had just watched ALMOST HUMAN. It really did work out perfect, as I can't think of somebody better who could have complemented the movie as well.

FF: You had a cameo in Almost Human, why not here?

JB: I actually do! I'm on the other side of the pay phone during the phone call. I just haven't credited myself on IMDB yet.

FF: What did you learn shooting Almost Human that you applied here?

JB: Never shoot a movie in 18 days.

FF: What was the best thing that happened while you were filming?

JB: The fact that it was the worst winter in decades. It was a nightmare to shoot, but that snow looks INCREDIBLE, and we certainly never planned for it.

The Mind’s Eye screens as part of FrightFest Glasgow 2016 on Friday 26th February at the GFT Screen 1, 9.00pm. Joe Begos will be in attendance.


MORE ARTICLES
Wes Craven Season welcomes in 2018 on Horror
Posted in Features, Friday 15th December 2017

Throughout January, Saturday nights at 9pm will be devoted to a Wes Craven Season as Horror Channel presents a retrospective of the late great genre director's career. Four of his supernatural shockers and scream-filled slashers will be broadcast, including the network premieres of serial killer chiller My Soul To Take, his macabre masterpiece The Serpent And The Rainbow, his diabolically electrifying Shocker and the goofy, gory satire The People Under The Stairs.

There are also network premieres for Franck Khalfoun's superior psychological horror Maniac, starring Elijah Wood as a scalp-loving serial killer, David S. Goyer's pulsating possession thriller The Unborn, starring Gary Oldman and Ham...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Ruth Platt, director of The Lesson
Posted in Interviews, Wednesday 6th December 2017

On the eve of Horror Channel's network premiere screening of The Lesson, director Ruth Platt talks about the decision to quit RADA, why her film isn't 'torture porn' and what the future holds.

The Lesson received its World Premiere at FrightFest. How did you react when it was chosen? And what was the experience like?

RP: I was really excited when I found out we'd been picked - we got a call from the team, and they were passionate about the film, and they are such a knowledgable and experienced small team, Greg, Paul, Alan and Ian, and it meant so much. Especially when the making of it had been such an arduous and difficult process! I had no idea how people would react to the film - it was su...

SHARE: READ MORE
Bloody British Season comes to a climax with The Descent!
Posted in Booth's Blog, Thursday 23rd November 2017

There's a lot we've got to be proud of here in Blighty. James Bond, Monty Python, David Bowie, and of course a healthy appetite for all things Horror, so over the past few Saturdays in November we've been enjoying our Bloody British Season which comes to its nerve-wracking climax this weekend!

The early noughties saw a resurgence in all areas of pop culture in the UK, and Horror was no different, with a slew of emerging directing talent making big bloody waves. Neil Marshall was at the helm with a film that took the genre in a new direction; down! He calls The Descent (2005) the sister film of his directorial debut Dog Soldiers, in that it features an all-female cast as opposed to the (nearly) all...

SHARE: READ MORE
The Evil In Us and P2 receive their UK TV premieres on Horror Channel in December
Posted in Features, Wednesday 22nd November 2017

Christmas nightmares come early on Horror Channel, as the UK's primary TV destination for genre fans serves up the UK TV premieres of Jason William Lee's slick and stylish modern take on the zombie virus, The Evil In Us and Frank Khalfoun's boundary-pushing crime slasher P2, starring Wes Bentley.

There are also network premieres for Adam Egypt Mortimer's deeply-cutting supernatural revenge chiller Some Kind Of Hate, Ruth Platt's astonishingly bravura art-house horror The Lesson, Travis Oates' powerfully disturbing thriller Don't Blink, starring Mena Suvari and Glen Morgan's gruesome Black Christmas, a remake of the classic 1974 seasonal slasher, starring popular scream queen Mary Elizabeth Winstead....

SHARE: READ MORE
Booth's Blog: Enter the world of Silent Hill
Posted in Booth's Blog, Friday 17th November 2017

I am genuinely so excited about the network premiere I'm about to talk about. It's a film that the critics enjoyed panning, but the fans loved. My recent Twitter-bate confirmed there's a lot of underground love for this strange, dark film. It started out as a grimy, pixelated survival horror game by Konami on the PS1 back in 1999, and it was revolutionary for being the first computer game experience that was genuinely psychological. It had the ability to be truly unnerving and unsettling, and I for one could not stop playing it. It's time for reality to literally crumble as we enter the world of Silent Hill.

Touted by many horror fans as the best ever game-to-film adaptation (a notoriously tricky route...

SHARE: READ MORE
More titles added to the Hammer Film Collection
Posted in News, Thursday 16th November 2017

In 1957, Hammer's first ever horror film in colour was released: The Curse of Frankenstein. Its huge success spawned many more Hammer Horror films and the studio's domination of the horror genre, which was to last for a decade and a half.

So 60 years on, to commemorate this anniversary, Studiocanal and Park Circus, in conjunction with FrightFest, Scalarama and more tbc, are releasing brand new restorations of eight classic Hammer Horror titles at cinemas and on DVD/Blu-ray doubleplay.

From the gothic horrors Scars of Dracula, Blood From The Mummy's Tomb, Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde, Horror Of Frankenstein and psychological chillers Fear In The Night, Straight On Till Mornin...

SHARE: READ MORE
Lost Doctor Who story to be released by BBC Books
Posted in News, Thursday 16th November 2017

Intergalactic war? That's just not cricket... or is it?

Doctor Who And The Kirkkitmen is a novel based on a recently discovered treatment and extensive notes found in the Douglas Adams archive in Cambridge. A truly 'lost' adventure and with legendary status among fans, this is a work by The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy author that no-one has ever read...

The Doctor promised Romana the end of the universe, so she's less than impressed when what she gets is a cricket match. But when play is interrupted by eleven figures in white uniforms and peaked skull helmets, wielding bat-shaped weapons that fire lethal bolts of light into the screaming crowd. The Krikkitmen are back. Millions of years ago, the pe...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with John Shackleton director of Panic Button
Posted in Interviews, Wednesday 15th November 2017

As social media horror feature Panic Button gets a remastered DVD and Download release, writer and producer John Shackleton reflects on the film's inspirational journey.

To start at the beginning, what was the genesis or the seed of the idea for Panic Button?

JS: The model of how to make a film actually came before the concept. I'd made a short film with a group of trainees using a bunch of self-imposed restrictions for practicalities sake, to make sure we completed and delivered within the three-week timeframe of the training scheme, who were my employers. The rules were quite simple - no more than five minutes' walk from the office (we couldn't afford a van), no dialogue (we did...

SHARE: READ MORE
Booth's Blog: A movie event with bite...!
Posted in Booth's Blog, Tuesday 7th November 2017

There is something incredibly primal about our fear of sharks. Just one look at the Great White Shark's gargantuan mouth peppered with oversized teeth designed to tear you in half and you can feel the fear pervade your entire body. We have always known about this supreme killer of the seas, but it was not until 1975 when Jaws was released unto an unsuspecting audience that the 'hysteria' surrounding the Great White Shark was born. Jaws has come to represent a huge turning point in the film industry. It invented the 'summer blockbuster', it was one of the first films to use high concept marketing and merchandise, and it continues to be deconstructed globally in film schools for its multi-layered metaphors, ranging from 'Vagi...

SHARE: READ MORE
PICK OF THE WEEK
The Descent
THE DESCENT
Wednesday 20th December
9.00 PM
Star Trek: The Next Generation
STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION
Thursday 28th December
7.00 PM
Texas Chainsaw
TEXAS CHAINSAW
Tuesday 26th December
10.50 PM