ARTICLES

LATEST | FEATURES | INTERVIEWS | NEWS | FRIGHTFEST | REVIEWS

Interview With Lowell Dean Director Of WolfCop
By James Whittington, Friday 22nd August 2014

Wolf Cop 1FrightFest is at its best when its at its most outrageous and one movie that really hits that mark is WolfCop. Its a wild, hilarious and gore-drenched movie about, well, a cop that's a werewolf!

Best seen with a crown of like-minded horror fans this is sure to be the next big midnight movie masterpiece. I've had the pleasure of chatting to the film's director Lowell Dean.

HC: How did the WolfCop project come together?

LD: After having the idea for WolfCop I partnered with Saskatchewan production company Echolands Creative, and we shot a concept trailer to raise money for the feature. As we were researching ways to finance it, we found the CineCoup Accelerator online. CineCoup was a first of its kind platform, a social media competition where filmmakers face off for votes. Teams submit their trailer and new weekly videos to build up an audience and sell them on the idea of their film. 90 teams from across Canada entered for the final prize - a budget of up to a million dollars and guaranteed theatrical release in Canada. At the end of three months, WolfCop was selected.

HC: Did it take long to write and did it change much over the time that process took?

LD: I wrote the first draft a year before we made the film, even before we shot our concept trailer, then a few subsequent drafts after the whole CineCoup process. CineCoup had some notes on the script, so I incorporated those notes. I also focused on tightening it up to ensure it was something we could realistically shoot within our time and budget. There were quite a few changes to the script during pre-production, but primarily superficial changes, adding details, and fleshing out the characters. The major beats stayed the same since draft one.

HC: Was it difficult balancing the horror and more serious moments?

LD: Balancing the tone of the story was one of the biggest challenges in making WolfCop. There were many shades of comedy, horror, and straightforward drama to work into the movie, so we had to take it on a scene by scene basis and also watch the overall arcs of the characters. I didn't want it to descend into slapstick, but I also didn't want it to feel like the real, serious world. The horror comes primarily in our scenes of transformation or aftermath as WolfCop is on the hunt. He doesn't really arrest people. Not with those big claws.

HC: How did you go about casting the movie?

LD: Casting was a fun process. We knew we wanted Leo Fafard to be our WolfCop long before production, so once we had CineCoup on board with that it was about building the best ensemble possible around Leo. That came down to finding actors capable of walking that tightrope of drama, horror and comedy. Actors who could add a realistic dimension to our comic book style characters. I knew Amy Matysio and wanted her for WolfCop's partner, Tina. I had previously worked with Jesse Moss and knew he could walk that line of absurdity as our Gang Leader. The rest of the cast, like Aidan Devine, Sarah Lind, and Jonathan Cherry were welcome discoveries who delivered on all fronts. It is a great ensemble.

HC: Was it a difficult movie to pitch to get funding?

LD: Financing the film prior to joining forces with CineCoup was a challenge. It seemed like WolfCop didn't fit inside the traditional box of Canadian films selected for funding. It might have been because we were from Saskatchewan (which is often overlooked), or perhaps the absurd nature of the project, but we were rejected a few times before CineCoup saw our potential.

HC: What sort of a budget did you have?

LD: The budget of WolfCop was a little over a million dollars. It was a decent budget, but tight for all the crazy things we were trying to cram into our movie. We shot the film in 17 days, which is insane.

HC: The main transformation scene is pretty impressive; did it take long to shoot?

LD: The transformations took time, because we knew they needed to be right. Werewolf movies live and die by their transformations. We knew time would be tight so Emersen Ziffle (our practical effects artist) and I had many discussions prior to shooting on maximizing our time. We also didn't try to make our transformations too big or elaborate, which helped. Just really, really disturbing.

HC: A lot of the effects seem to be practical ones; do you think this adds to the whole WolfCop experience?

LD: Keeping the majority of our effects practical adds a sense of twisted realism. It also has a handmade quality that is both charming and referential of the classic era of monster cinema. I love Emersen Ziffle's work, and there is something so special and unique about working with practical effects. Actually seeing WolfCop on set was a blast.

HC: Are you a fan of werewolf movies and if so which one is your favourite?

LD: I am a fan of werewolf movies. My favorite is An American Werewolf In London. Great story, great tone, great horror.

HC: Are you nervous about the movie showing at FrightFest?

LD: I am always nervous for a new audience to see WolfCop! I hope people enjoy it.

HC: So, what projects are you working on at the moment?

LD: I have a couple horror scripts in development, but my main focus right now is WolfCop 2.

HC: Lowell Dean, thank you much.

LD: Thank you!


MORE INTERVIEWS
Interview with Bill Watterson director of Dave Made a Maze
Posted on Sunday 4th November 2018
William Watterson

At Grimmfest 2017 we had the chance to view one of the most original pieces of cinema we'd seen in a long time, Dave Made a Maze. Directed by Bill Watterson it's an intelligent, thought-provoking film that deserves to reach a global audience and will be released here early 2019. We chatted to Bill about this incredible movie.

HC: Where did this concept come from?

WW: Three places: Steven was underway on a script called 'Operation: Death Maze,' or something cool like that. Portions of it were re-purposed after he jibed with a story I told about my mom coming home and seeing an incredible fort that I'd build in my bedroom, and concluding that I'd gotten lost within it when I d...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Paul Hyett director of Peripheral
Posted on Friday 2nd November 2018
Paul HyettPaul Hyett is a firm FrightFest favourite. His work jumps from genre you genre with ease but still retains that "Hyett" feeling in each piece. His latest work, Peripheral is having its UK Premiere at the FrightFest Halloween 2018 event so we decided to chat to Paul about this and his view on technology.

HC: How did the project of Peripheral come together?

PH: Peripheral was bought to me by the original producer, he thought I'd be a good fit. Originally he had pitched me a one woman in a room, contained location about bad technology theme. It didn't feel appealing as after Howl, which was a big film in terms of cast, VFX, stunts etc and I was looking for a more challenging film logisticall...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Julian Richards, director of Reborn
Posted on Wednesday 17th October 2018
Julian Richards

Ahead of the World premiere screening of Reborn at FrightFest Halloween, Julian Richards discusses the torturous challenges of Daddy's Girl, why he wishes every actress was like Barbara Crampton and future plans, including directing the English language remake of Rabies.

HC: After six years away from directing, you have two films, Reborn and Daddy's Girl poised for distribution. Why these two very different films now?

JR: My previous film Shiver was completed in 2012 and it took longer for me to get back into the directing saddle because of commitments I had to my sales company Jinga Films. The company was growing quickly and needed more of my time and energy. We had grown from handling th...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Jules Vincent, co-writer and producer of Alive
Posted on Thursday 4th October 2018
Jules Vincent

Grimmfest 2018 is well underway and delivering some memorable movie moments, and one of the best is showing on Sunday, Alive. This cracking film sees the return of Grimmfest favourite Rob Grant as director and has been co-written and co-produced by Chuck McCue and Jules Vincent. Here Jules tells all about this brilliant piece.

HC: Where did the idea for Alive come from?

JV: We'd talked about writing a horror screenplay for a number of years before we finally came up with the right idea. We're both big fans of classic horror and we love the works of Hitchcock, Carpenter, Friedkin, and Cronenberg so in a way we had a very specific style and feel in mind before we even had the story. A...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Olivier Afonso director of Girls With Balls
Posted on Wednesday 3rd October 2018
Olivier Afonso director of Girls With Balls

Grimmfest 2018 kicks off tomorrow and one of the many highlights of the four day event is the blood-splattered shocker Girls With Balls. We chatted to it's director Olivier Afonso about this fab film and his career as an SFX artists.

HC: What inspired you to write Girls With Balls?

OA: My co-writer and I we wanted to write a trash comedy to entertain an audience because we love festivals: the atmosphere, people screaming, laughing... Personally, I'm inspired by the eighties and nineties movies such as of Sam Raimi, Peter Jackson, Alex de la Iglesia. We wanted to make a survival movie but with strong women, a girl ...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Ezequiel Endelman and Leandro Montejano, the creative forces behind Crystal Eyes
Posted on Saturday 15th September 2018
Ezequiel Endelman and Leandro Montejano

FrightFest 2018 exposed attendees to horror from all over the world and one that made an incredibly stylish and retro impact was the superb giallo inspired shocker, Crystal Eyes. Here the co-writers and co-directors Ezequiel Endelman and Leandro Montejano tell us all about this affectionate love letter to the classics of the 80s.

Where did the idea for Crystal Eyes come from?

Crystal Eyes was supposed to be the third episode of our web-series called No Podras Dormir Esta Noche (You Won't Sleep Tonight) which paid homage to different horror sub genres in each episode, and eventually it turned into a feature film. We love Giallo si...

SHARE: READ MORE
Exclusive interview with Adam Green, director of Hatchet.
Posted on Thursday 13th September 2018
Adam Green director of Hatchet

Ahead of Horror Channel's UK TV Premiere of Hatchet on Friday 14th Sept, director Adam Green gives an exclusive interview about his beloved franchise and what the future holds for Victor Crowley...

Hatchet is finally getting its first showing on UK TV, courtesy of Horror Channel. We're excited, are you?

I couldn't be more excited! I've always said that even though Hatchet may have world premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in NYC, it was at FrightFest in London where "Victor Crowley" was truly born. FrightFest was "the screening heard around the world" and the UK audience was so enthusiastic over Hatchet that every genre festival on t...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Tom de Ville, director of Corvidae
Posted on Wednesday 5th September 2018
Tom de Ville director of Corvidae

HC: This is your first short as a director, what inspired you to write this script?

TdV: I read a really interesting article about how smart crows are, in particular how they can hold grudges. Apparently a group of scientists had gone out and harassed a murder of crows whilst wearing masks. If they went back wearing the masks, the crows would remember them and fight back. If they didn't wear the masks, the crows would leave them alone. This made me start thinking about what would happen if someone tried to save a crow from a bunch of kids who were trying to kill it. Would the other crows from its murder remember this? And what would they do to help her?...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Stewart Sparke, director of Book of Monsters
Posted on Wednesday 5th September 2018
Director Stewart Sparke watches a scene

HC: Your last movie, The Creature Below was two years ago, what's life been back since then?

SS: Since The Creature Below premiered at Frightfest in 2016 things haven't really stopped for myself and my collaborator Paul Butler. We were lucky enough to have the film released on DVD and VOD in over eight countries under various names. I think my favourite has to be Japan's Leviathan X: From the Deep! The film even had a theatrical release in Taiwan which was quite surreal as it was playing opposite Thor Ragnarok over there so overall, we've been completely blown away by everything that's happened. Paul and I are always coming up wit...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Ferdinando D'Urbano actor, writer, producer of The Laplace's Demon
Posted on Tuesday 28th August 2018
Ferdinando D'Urbano - Director of Photography Producer COL

A stand-out movie from FrightFest 2018 tested the brain power of those who saw it. The Laplace's Demon is an incredibly powerful piece so we chatted to one of the creatives behind it, Ferdinando D'Urbano.

HC: I'd never heard of Laplace's Demon theory before, can you give us a quick explanation of what it is?

FDU: The Laplace's Demon is a philosophical theory of the early 1800s. Pierre Simon Laplace was a French mathematician who in his work "Essai philosophique sur les probabilites" (A philosophical essay on probabilities), theorized that if there were an intellect capable of knowing al...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with Andre Gower director of Wolfman's Got Nards
Posted on Monday 27th August 2018
Wolfman's Got Nards

HC: You had already starred in a lot of stuff before The Monster Squad came along, did you think that this was just "another" acting job?

AG: At the time, it was just that. The next audition, the next project. However, once on set and seeing what you were a part of, we realized quickly that this was something bigger and more unique than anything we had done before or may even get to do in the future.

HC: Were you a fan of the Universal monsters at that time?

AG: I always had an appreciation for the classics even as a kid. As you mature, you keep that appreciation and learn more about it and how it affects the present and realize these were very important...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interview with John Rocco and Abiel Bruhn the writers and directors of The Night Sitter
Posted on Sunday 26th August 2018

HC: Where did the idea for The Night Sitter come from?

JR: From the beginning of this story, I had my childhood home in Nashville in mind as the perfect location. After several months of convincing, my parents allowed us to film in their house. It's a pretty amazing feeling to have grown up in the same location that we'd eventually film our first feature in! We were able to incorporate all the parts of my house that used to scare me as a child and weave them into a story about witches, which was extremely fun and nostalgic at times. While developing the story, I tried to recall the scary thoughts I had when I was Kevin's age.

AB: Finding an inspiring location (the house has this stran...

SHARE: READ MORE
Interviews Archive: 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006
PICK OF THE WEEK
ATM
ATM
Tuesday 18th December
10.55 PM
P2
P2
Monday 24th December
9.00 PM
The Invaders
THE INVADERS
Tuesday 25th December
8.00 PM